Economy Related Content

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Students: the New Debtor Class

From the

Jackie Hayes

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Finding Food Justice

From the

Susan Adair & Donna Muhs-McCarten

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99 Percenters Occupy Wall Street

From the

by Amy Goodman

If 2,000 tea party activists descended on Wall Street, you would probably have an equal number of reporters there covering them. Yet 2,000 people did occupy Wall Street on Saturday. They weren’t carrying the banner of the tea party, the Gadsden flag with its coiled snake and the threat “Don’t Tread on Me.” Yet their message was clear: “We are the 99 percent that will no longer tolerate the greed and corruption of the 1 percent.” They were there, mostly young, protesting the virtually unregulated speculation of Wall Street that caused the global financial meltdown.

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Solidarity Across Borders

From the

by Jessica Maxwell & Ursula Rozum

“There are going to be some losers. Campesinos [small farmers], indigenous, Afro-Colombians, they aren’t going to win.” –US Embassy official in Colombia

 

Activists in Syracuse, Cortland and Ithaca have maintained a solidarity project with activists in the Movimiento Campesino de Cajibío (Small Farmers Movement of Cajibío—MCC) in Cauca, Colombia since 2003. We have organized six delegations to Colombia and hosted three visits from Cajibío organizers to CNY.

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Put Your Two Cents In

From the

by Burton Schaber and Dania Souid

The Peace Council’s booth at our second annual SummerCrafts at Jazz Fest was a mixture of music, fliers, questions and dialogue. We decided to be even more interactive this year by inviting festival goers to put their two cents into the federal budget.

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Three Days in the Life of a Migrant Laborer:

Day 1

From the

by David Van Arsdale

Editor’s Note: Labor has been under assault from all sides. Sadly, this has created a false dichotomy between the rights of migrant workers (be they documented or otherwise) and those of US workers. In this investigative piece, David Van Arsdale reveals an economy increasingly dependant on flexible labor, which seems to threaten the security of work for us all. In sharing this experience, we hope to spark a fruitful debate on the potential of solidarity of workers across national boundaries.

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