Nuclear Power & Weapons Related Content

Hiroshima Day Peace Procession 1945-2015

Thu, Aug 6, 2015 11:45am - 12:45pm
Gather downtown Syracuse, Clinton Square

On August 6, 1945, the U.S. government dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, followed three days later by the bombing of Nagasaki, killing almost 200,000 innocent people. On August 6, Syracuse activist take to the street to mourn the tragic loss of innocent life and commit to a world without war.

Present tense: Selections from “The A-Bomb and Humanity”

Wed, Aug 9, 2017 1:00pm - Fri, Sep 8, 2017 2:00pm
Bishop Harrison Diocesan Center, 1342 Lancaster Ave, Syracuse, NY


Syracuse Peace Council, 914Works, and Bishop Harrison Center Announce August Events for a Nuclear Free World

Announcement

Support the "Restricting First Use of Nuclear Weapons Act of 2017"

On Jan. 24, 2017, Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) and Representative Ted Lieu (D-Los Angeles County) introduced THE RESTRICTING FIRST USE OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS ACT OF 2017, S 200; HR 669.

Nagasaki Day Procession

Wed, Aug 9, 2017 11:30am - 1:00pm
Hanover Square (E. Water and S. Warren Sts.)

SUPPORT A NUCLEAR FREE FUTURE

On Nagasaki Day, we will be remembering and dedicating ourselves to preventing nuclear terror in a solemn procession downtown.

Gather behind City Hall Commons at 11:30am, the procession will begin at 12pm. You may bring your own signs or borrow some of ours.

Hiroshima Day Family Picnic

Sun, Aug 6, 2017 5:00pm - 9:00pm
Thornden Park Lily Pond, Thornden Park Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210

COME SUPPORT A NUCLEAR FREE FUTURE

Come to our annual Hiroshima Day Family Picnic in remembrance of the nuclear attack at Hiroshima as well as working towards a nuclear free world.

Peace games, crafts, lantern floating, Nia and Salsa classes for kids and adults, food by With Love Restaurant, Wegmans and others! All are welcome!

This event is will be followed up on August 9 with the Nagasaki Day Procession downtown.

Hiroshima Day Planning Meeting

Thu, Jul 6, 2017 7:15pm - 8:30pm
Syracuse Peace Council, 2013 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, NY, Second Floor

If you are interested in helping out with this year's Hiroshima/ Nagasaki rememberance events (Peace Picnic on August 6 and procession downtown on August 9), we are having another planning meeting coming up!

Contact: Diane Swords- drswords@gmail.com

                                 315-391-4484

Nuclear Free Word Meeting

Mon, Jul 10, 2017 7:00pm - 8:30pm
114 Milner Ave, Syracuse, NY

The Nuclear Free World Committee works to fulfill a vision of a world free from the threat of war and nuclear weapons, where resources are directed to human and environmental needs. We are an affiliate of Peace Action, the nation's largest grassroots peace and justice organization.

Contact: Diane Swords- drswords@gmail.com

                                   (315-391-4484)

Don't Bank on the Bomb

Thu, Feb 23, 2017 7:00pm - 9:00pm
ArtRage Gallery, 505 Hawley Avenue, Syracuse NY 13203

Cooperative Federal and Hansens's Advisory Services will share strategies to "Win Beyond Washington" through socially responsible banking and investing.

RSVP to the Facebook event here.

How to Get Involved: 


Don't Bank on the Bomb event flyer

For next steps and to participate, see http://peacecouncil.net/programs/nuclear-free-world-committee

The Forgotten Bomb

Tue, Jan 17, 2017 7:00pm - 9:00pm
ArtRage Gallery, 505 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, NY

Admission free. Donations appreciated.

 

When the Cold War ended, worry about nuclear weapons receded. Has the nuclear threat diminished?

 

The Forgotten Bomb is a global journey to discover our prospects for finally living in a nuclear-free world and how we can participate in creating that world.

Newsletter

Remembering Hiroshima/Nagasaki

Building the Anti-Nuclear Anti-Imperialist Movement

From the

by Diane and Peter Swords

Distorted History
Syracuse Peace Council urges everyone to use the Hiroshima/Nagasaki Commemoration to strengthen the anti-nuclear, anti-imperialist movement. President Obama’s historic trip to Hiroshima reminds the world of the ongoing urgency of dealing with nuclear weapons. His ambiguous legacy makes it clear that rhetoric and symbolism will not achieve nuclear abolition.

Close