PEACES
Compiled by Elisha Peck

Army Reported Wrong Cause of Death to Military Family
The Army failed to report the correct cause of death to friends and family of 1st Lt. Kenneth Ballard.

For over a year, the Army was aware that he had been killed by accidental fire instead of being killed in action, as initially was reported after his platoon returned from a mission in Najaf, Iraq. His mother, Karen Meredith of Mountain View, California, received a letter of apology from Army Secretary Francis Harvey about not being informed of the actual cause of her son's death. Meredith publicly opposes the war and has attended anti-war rallies in Crawford, Texas with Cindy Sheehan.

This is clearly negligence on the part of the Army to update public records and inform the families. This is not the first such case that has been reported - Pat Tillman's family was left waiting for correct information on their son's death last spring.

It is unclear at this time why the Army has not been more careful in reporting these deaths to the families.

US Leader in Weapons Sales to Developing Nations
According to the Congressional Research Service (CRS) report in 2004, the US contributed 42% of the weapons deliveries to developing nations, with more than $9.6 billion in arms sales. Worldwide deliveries have increased from $20.8 billion in 2003 to $22.5 billion in 2004. Contracts to sell arms rose from $15.1 billion to $21.8 billion. Missiles, ammunition, combat aircraft and submarines were sold to nations such as China, Egypt and India.

The CRS reported that of the $37 billion of worldwide arms sales, 59% were to developing nations. One result of the first Gulf War is that the US has been a top seller in arms for eight years. Russia is second in arms sales and sells mainly to China and India.

The CRS reported that of the $37 billion of worldwide arms sales, 59% were to developing nations. One result of the first Gulf War is that the US has been a top seller in arms for eight years. Russia is second in arms sales and sells mainly to China and India.


Library Sues Over Patriot Act Clause
The controversial Patriot Act is being challenged in federal court for the first time by a library, with help from the American Civil Liberties Union, over a clause that allows the US government to retrieve typically confidential information about a patron's library use.

The Patriot Act, which was enacted in October 2001, allows government authorities such as the FBI to investigate any "terror suspects" records at libraries, hospitals, businesses, and bookstores.

Crucial details about this case are not available to the public because of a gag order that doesn't allow the ACLU's web site to display information. The library is more than likely located in Connecticut, as the ACLU branch filing the lawsuit is located there. See the ACLU's website at www.aclu.org.

Bush-Cheney Companies Profit from Hurricane Katrina
Joe Allbaugh, a former campaign manager for George W. Bush and also a former head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has two major corporate clients signed on for recovery work on the aftermath of hurricane Katrina.

Shaw Group, Inc. and Halliburton's auxiliary company, Kellogg, Brown and Root have each received million dollar contracts to start recovery work. Halliburton is well connected, as Dick Cheney is a former CEO. Cheney continues to receive deferred payments from Halliburton and his tax filings report that he received $194,852 last year.

Both of Allbaugh's major clients are no strangers to receiving large amounts of money from the government. Kellogg, Brown and Root received $29.8 million from the Pentagon to rebuild Navy bases, while Shaw has received $100 million for housing management and construction, and another $100 million from the US Army Corps of Engineers. Each of these companies has also received billion dollar no-bid contracts for work in Iraq.

Shaw Group spokesman, Chris Sammons, would not comment on Allbaugh's involvement in any of the contracts.


Eyes Wide Open in Ithaca - October 6-9
Eyes Wide Open, the American Friends Service Committee's widely acclaimed exhibition on the human cost of the Iraq war, commemorates all the lives lost.

The exhibit includes a pair of boots honoring each US military casualty, while a field of shoes and a wall of remembrance memorializes the Iraqis killed.

The exhibit opens on October 6, and can be viewed from 10 am-6 pm at the Cornell University Arts Quad. Then, it is open continuously at DeWitt Park from 10 am Friday, October 7 through 4 pm Sunday, October 9.

On Saturday, October 8, Kathy Kelly from Voices in the Wildnerness will speak at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Ithaca from 7:30 - 9 pm.

For the full schedule of events, see www.afsc.org/eyes/details/ithaca/default.htm

Elisha is a LeMoyne College Communications major who is interning at SPC this semester.