Onondaga Land Rights & Our Common Future Part II

A Collaborative Educational Series
bringing together the Central New York community, Syracuse University, SUNY ESF, Le Moyne College, Empire State College and others

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Onondaga Land Rights: Progress for Mother Earth
Monday, October 25, 2010
Syracuse Stage
, 820 East Genesee St., Syracuse map

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Speakers: Tadadaho Sid Hill (Onondaga) and Joe Heath

Sid Hill is the Tadadaho (spiritual leader) of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. He “warmed the seat” (apprenticed) for two years before being “condoled” (installed) as Tadadaho in April 2001. While the Tadadaho has special responsibilities, he has no more power than the other 49 Haudenosaunee Chiefs.
On May 13, 2002, Sid gave the Thanksgiving Prayer of the Haudenosaunee in the Onondaga language before the United Nations’ Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. “I greet you to the northeast territory of the Great Turtle Island, now known as North America,” Hill said to the audience, before giving a brief welcome speech.
Like many other Haudenosaunee men, Sid was an ironworker before assuming his current role.

Joe Heath has served as the Onondaga Nation General Counsel for over 25 years. A Viet Nam era conscientious objector, his legal work has included civil rights issues (famously the Attica trial), criminal defense, child abuse and environmental protection. Joe speaks widely on the Onondaga Land Rights Action; environmental issues, with a particular focus on the Onondaga Lake watershed and hydrofracking; cultural preservation issues for native people and more.



Series Co-Sponsors

Syracuse University: Chancellor’s Office, Religion, Anthropology, Communication and Rhetorical Studies, Geography, Hendricks Chapel, History, Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Native American Students at Syracuse, Native American Student Program, Native American Studies Program, Office of Multicultural Affairs, Program in the Analysis and Resolution of Conflict, Program on Latin America and the Caribbean, School of Education, Student Environmental Action Coalition, Students for a Democratic Society, University College, College of Visual and Performing Arts, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, and the Future of Minority Studies @ SU and the Writing Program

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry: President's Office, Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, Environmental Studies Department, Kincentric

Other Educational Institutions: Le Moyne College, Center for Urban and Regional Applied Research (CURAR), Empire State College, Colgate University Native American Studies Program, Hamilton College Department of Religious Studies, Imagining America, Ithaca College Department of Anthropology & Native American Studies Program, Onondaga Community College, St. Lawrence University Native American Studies Program, SUNY Cortland, Upstate Medical University Office of Diversity & Affirmative Action and Multicultural Events Planning Committee and Wells College

Community co-sponsors: Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation, Indigenous Values Initiative, InterFaith Works and Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation and Syracuse Center of Excellence

For more information:
Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation, (315) 472-5478, noon@peacecouncil.net